csa2013-3

This Week in Veggies – What’s Fresh at Your Local Farmers Market

by Alice Magdziak • June 30, 2013 • Garden State, Green JerseyComments (0)9

We’ve been a part of the Westfield CSA (community supported agriculture) group for several years now. Since our farmer also delivers to a few local farmers markets, we think his shares are pretty representative of what other organic farmers will be bringing to their markets this week. Check out what we got this week so you can see what your farmers will have this weekend!

This week we got a giant share!  There’s oak leaf and red leaf lettuce, summer squash, broccoli, dill, elephant garlic, salad turnips, English peas, kale, spinach, purslane and tatsoi.

What is purslane?

Our CSA newsletter did such a good job explaining purslane last year, Portulaca oleracea, that I’m just republishing it completely here.  It is native to India and Persia and has spread throughout the world as an edible plant and as a weed. Several ancient cultures have included purslane as a part of their cuisine, including those of Greece and Central America. Russians dry and can it for the winter. In Mexico it is called verdolaga and is a favorite comfort food. There, it is eaten in omelets, as a side dish, rolled in tortillas, or dropped by handfuls into soups and stews.

With fleshy succulent leaves and stems with yellow flowers, they look like baby jade plants. The stems lay flat on the ground as they radiate from a single taproot sometimes forming large mats of leaves. Purslane aficionados prefer eating fresh young plants, especially the leaves and tender stem tips. The taste is similar to watercress or spinach. Use purslane in salads or on sandwiches instead of lettuce or pickles. Purslane can also be cooked as a potherb, steamed, stir-fried or pureed. It tends to get a bit slimy if overcooked. It can be substituted for spinach in many recipes.

Copyright, You Don’t Know Jersey, LLC (2010-2014)

Pin It

Related Posts

Leave a Reply